Stories written by Kitty Stapp

U.N. Names Winners of First Nelson Mandela Prize

The winners of the first-ever United Nations Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela Prize were announced Monday by General Assembly President Sam Kutesa, 25 years to the day that Mandela addressed the U.N. General Assembly to denounce apartheid in his home country of South Africa.

New Approaches to Managing Disaster Focus on Resilience

Natural disasters have become a fact of life for millions around the world, and the future forecast is only getting worse.

Views from the Caribbean ahead of COP21, the December 2015 Climate Change Summit in Paris – Building Resilience to Disaster: Adaptation

From constructing barriers against rising sea levels to rehabilitating mangroves and providing agrometeorology services, the Caribbean isn’t waiting for a new international agreement on climate change to start implementing adaptation measures. But funding to roll out such projects on the necessary scale remains a key issue, and many communities remain desperately vulnerable to storms and flooding.

Remittances from Europe Top 100 Billion Dollars

One in five migrant workers – about 50 million people - lives and works in Europe, making the region home to a quarter of global remittance flows, according to a new report by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Small Victories at Bonn Climate Talks

As climate talks wind down in Bonn, Germany, observers of the negotiations say that despite some progress on a draft text, key issues remain unresolved and will carry over at least until the next round in August.

Chinese Public Most Worried About Climate Change

A new survey finds that China leads the world in public support for government action on climate change.

Journalists, Gov’ts Square Off in Game of Drones

For some, the word "drone" immediately conjures up ominous phrases like "targeted assassination" and "precision strike."

Civil Society, Journalists “Risk Death” as Burundi Crackdown Intensifies

As the U.N. Security Council met to discuss the ongoing political crisis in Burundi Thursday, a rights group says violence has intensified in the capital Bujumbura, with individuals and groups close to the presidency and the ruling party targeting civil society activists, journalists and opposition members.

Climate Fund Rolls Out Amid Hopes It Stays “Green”

After a difficult infancy, the Green Climate Fund is finally getting some legs. The big question now is what direction it will toddle off in.

Despite Ukraine Cease-Fire, Civilians Still Living in Fear

The civilian population in Ukraine continues to suffer serious human rights abuses, intimidation and harassment by armed groups, including summary executions, as well as torture and ill-treatment by authorities in detention, according to the latest report from the U.N. Human Rights Monitoring Mission in Ukraine released Monday.

U.N. Security Council Takes “Historic” Stand on Killings of Journalists

When war breaks out, most non-combatants run the other way. But a handful of courageous reporters see it as their duty to tell the world what's happening on the ground. And many pay a high price.

Press Freedom Groups Denounce NSA Spying on AJ Bureau Chief

Ahmad Muaffaq Zaidan doesn’t deny that he’s had contact with terrorist groups. In fact, it would have been rather difficult to do his job otherwise.

Police Killings Challenge U.S. “Exceptionalism”

Since being roundly chastised last fall by the U.N. Committee Against Torture for excessive use of force by its law enforcement agencies, the United States hasn't exactly managed to repair its international reputation.

Shift to Renewables Seems Inevitable, But Is It Fast Enough?

Climate change may be one of the most divisive issues in the U.S. Congress today, but despite the staunch denialism of Republicans, experts say the global transition from fossil fuels to renewables is already well underway.

In Thrall to the Mall Crawl and Urban Sprawl

There's little argument about the basic facts: It's ugly (think strip malls and big box stores). It's not very convenient (hours spent behind the wheel to get to work). And it wreaks havoc on the natural environment (lost farmland and compromised watersheds).

Money Pipeline Flowing Between U.S. Congress and Big Oil

With battle lines sharpening over the stalled Keystone XL pipeline, a new analysis details the intense industry lobbying of both houses of the U.S. Congress since 2013 – to the tune of 58.8 million dollars by five refinery companies alone.

Developing Nations Write Hopeful New Chapters in a Toxic Legacy

The village of Dong Mai in Vietnam's agricultural heartland had a serious problem.

Students Score with Future Energy Prize

Innovative high schools in Mexico, Britain, Tanzania and Abu Dhabi that aim to power classrooms with solar, biogas, wind and other sustainable energy sources were among the winners of the 2013 Zayed Future Energy Prize, held at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi. 

RIGHTS: To the World’s Unsung Feminists, We Salute You!

What do a Muslim advocate for battered women, an African American congresswoman, and the singer of a hit cover of the song "Santa Baby" have in common?

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