Stories written by Milagros Salazar
Milagros Salazar started her career with IPS in June 2006. She specialises in social and environmental conflicts, in particular those relating to the mining, oil and gas industries in Peru. She also writes about the illegal production and trade of cocaine throughout country. Salazar also writes for the political pages of the daily La República, published in Lima. Since 1993, she has been working as an editor and correspondent for several national dailies, including Expreso and El Peruano. Born in Lima in 1976, Salazar holds a bachelor’s degree in social communication from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and a master’s degree in human rights from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Perú. She has also pursued further study on political governance as part of programmes sponsored by the U.S.-based George Washington University.

Problems Inspire Ingenious Solutions in Peruvian Amazon Town

He may look like a rapper, but 33-year-old José Antonio Bardález is the mayor of Jepelacio, in the Peruvian Amazon. His ingenious innovations in the municipality include transforming waste management into a source of income and making spring water a source of drinking water.

Peru Needs to Know More About its Water in Order to Supply More People With the Valuable Resource

Peru urgently needs a national plan for the management of water over the next two decades, one that will take into account the effects of climate change and the social and environmental conflicts triggered by problems over water.

Bagua Massacre – A Test for Justice in Peru

The trial of 52 indigenous people that just got underway for a 2009 massacre near the city of Bagua in northwest Peru will test the judicial system’s independence and ability to impart justice.

In Peru, Low-Income Cancer Patients Find Fresh Hope

Her tiny fingers and toes have been painted with different shades of nail polish, the bright colours contrasting sharply with the bleak road she has been on for half her young life.

Prosecution of Forced Sterilisations in Peru Still Possible

Shelving the case of the forced sterilisations of more than 2,000 women in Peru during the Alberto Fujimori regime was a surprise move by the prosecutor in charge. What happened? An IPS investigation found that legal avenues to pursue justice have not been exhausted.

Small-scale Organic Farming Gets a Boost in Peru

A new institution set up in Peru will strengthen small-scale organic farming, providing support to some 43,000 exporters of ecological products and another 350,000 who supply the domestic market with environmentally-friendly products.

Peru’s New Cybercrime Law Undermines Transparency Legislation

A new law against cybercrime that restricts the use of data and freedom of information in Peru clashes with earlier legislation, on transparency, which represented a major stride forward in citizen rights.

Survivors of Peru’s Armed Conflict Still Waiting

Venisia Ávalos, a 65-year-old indigenous woman from Peru’s highlands region of Ayacucho, looks for her son’s name among a labyrinth formed by thousands of small grey stones.

Building the Future Enterprise by Enterprise in Rural Peru

Women and young people are central players in dozens of small businesses and environmental protection plans that are changing the lives of poor rural families in the Andes highlands of southern Peru.

Supporting Rural Community Self-Management in Southern Peru

Some 40 multicoloured tents were set up to showcase the fruits of community-based rural development projects in the main square of this village in southern Peru during a visit by IFAD president Kanayo Nwanze.

World Bank Doctor Promises Not to Make Prescriptions

Long before he became president of the World Bank, South Korean physician Jim Yong Kim was on the dusty streets of the working-class Lima neighbourhood of Carabayllo, helping cure local residents of tuberculosis.

Q&A: “The State Does Not Lose Sovereignty If It Respects Indigenous Rights”

"There is a belief that consent is about saying yes or no, about who wins," observed James Anaya, the United Nations special rapporteur on indigenous rights. But consultation with indigenous peoples is a matter of “creating open processes where they can voice their opinions and influence decisions, and where there is the necessary will to seek consensus.”

Native People More Than Just Park Rangers

Some good-byes can actually mean the start of a long road working together. That was how it felt at the end of the World Indigenous Network (WIN) conference in this northern Australian city.

Sharing Indigenous Knowledge from All Ends of the Globe

This city in northern Australia brought them together to share their experiences this week. They are indigenous Shipiba people fighting indiscriminate logging in Peru’s Amazon jungle region and delegates from the Ando-Kpomey community in Togo, which created and protects a 100-hectare forest.

Guardians of the Land and Sea Meet in Darwin

“Are you a park ranger?” IPS asked. “No, I am one of the owners of the territory,” Ángel Durán responded in a firm voice. The Bolivian indigenous leader is in this northern Australian city along with 1,200 other native delegates from over 50 countries for the World Indigenous Network (WIN) conference.

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