Inter Press ServiceVideo – Inter Press Service http://www.ipsnews.net News and Views from the Global South Thu, 29 Jun 2017 01:29:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Any Way to Help Slow Down Climate Change… Individually?http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/anyway-help-slow-climate-change-individually-yes-can/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=anyway-help-slow-climate-change-individually-yes-can http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/anyway-help-slow-climate-change-individually-yes-can/#comments Tue, 27 Jun 2017 05:35:49 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=151059 It is no secret that the biggest responsible for climate change is greed. The greed of the world’s largest private corporations, which blindly seek unlimited high financial benefits. And the greed of those politicians who are also blindly keen about holding their temporary power at any cost, thus not daring to challenge big business. Ordinary […]

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Food waste has become a dangerous habit: about 1/3 of the food we produce globally (1.3 billion tonnes of the food every year) is lost or wasted

Hunger is still one of the most urgent development challenges, yet the world is producing more than enough food. Credit: FAO

By IPS World Desk
ROME, Jun 27 2017 (IPS)

It is no secret that the biggest responsible for climate change is greed. The greed of the world’s largest private corporations, which blindly seek unlimited high financial benefits. And the greed of those politicians who are also blindly keen about holding their temporary power at any cost, thus not daring to challenge big business. Ordinary people can meanwhile help slow down such a hellish race.

For instance, food waste has become a dangerous habit: buying more than we need at supermarkets, letting fruits and vegetables spoil at home, or ordering more than we can eat at restaurants. This way, each year, about one third of the food we produce globally is lost or wasted.

This is what the United Nations over and again tells. The point is that humans are apparently not paying real attention to help avoid such a huge food waste and loss, while lamenting that hunger and poverty are again breaking records in several parts of the world, often due to man-made disasters caused by excessive and even voracious consumption.

9 Tips for Reducing Food Waste

Start small – Take smaller portions at home or share large dishes at restaurants.
Leave nothing behind – Keep your leftovers for another meal or use them in a different dish.
Buy only what you need – Be smart with your shopping. Make a list of what you need and stick to it. Don’t buy more than you can use.
Don’t be prejudiced - Buy “ugly” or irregularly shaped fruits and vegetables that are just as good but look a little different.
Check your fridge – Store food between 1 and 5 degrees Celsius for maximum freshness and shelf-life.
First in, first out – Try using produce that you had bought previously and, when you stack up your fridge and cupboards, move older products to the front and place newer ones in the back.
Understand dates - “Use by” indicates a date by which the food is safe to be eaten, while “best before” means the food’s quality is best prior to that date, but it is still safe for consumption after it. Another date mark that you can find on food packages is the “Sell by” date, which is helpful for stock rotation by manufacturers and retailers.
Compost – Some food waste might be unavoidable, so why not set up a compost bin!
Donate the surplus – Sharing is caring.

SOURCE: FAO

The facts about food waste and loss are bold. In developing countries, a large part of food –40 per cent– is lost at the harvest or processing stage, the Rome-based UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports. This is called “food loss.”

Meantime, in developed countries, this same percentage –40 per cent– is lost at the consumer or retail stage, throwing away food that is not bought at stores or food that is not eaten at home, restaurants and cafeterias. This is called “food waste.”

In short, every year, an estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of the food produced for human consumption worldwide is lost or wasted.

Wasting Food Increases Greenhouse Gas Emissions

“We have formed habits that hurt our world and put extra strain on our natural resources. When we waste food, we waste the labour, money and precious resources (like seeds, water, feed, etc.) that go into making the food, not to mention the resources that go into transporting it,” the UN agency reminds.

In other words, wasting food increases greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to climate change.

And it is an excess in an age where almost a billion people go hungry, and represents a waste of the labour, water, energy, land and other inputs that went into producing that food.

In industrialised countries, significant waste occurs at the consumption stage, while in low-income countries, food losses take place primarily during the early and middle stages of the supply chain, according to FAO.

At the same time, the losses incurred in developing countries are largely due to infrastructural constraints related to poor transport, storage, processing and packaging facilities, in addition to capacity gaps that result in inefficient production, harvesting, processing and transport of food.

Depending on the commodity and the local context, these activities –which are key to reducing losses– are often carried out by smallholder farmers or other actors operating close to the farm-gate, such as traders, collectors, agro-processors and marketing cooperatives, the UN specialised body adds.

One reason is that it is difficult for smallholders to ensure efficient delivery of produce to buyers because of their small-sized operations and their vulnerability when faced with environmental and market fluctuations.

This situation contributes not only to food loss, but also to higher transaction costs, loss of income and increased food insecurity, reinforcing the overall argument for supporting producer organisations that foster the collective capacity of smallholder operations.

Food waste has become a dangerous habit: about 1/3 of the food we produce globally (1.3 billion tonnes of the food every year) is lost or wasted

Credit: FAO/Rodger Bosch

The UAE Food Bank Initiative

Some countries have already taken political decisions to institutionalise the efforts of fighting hunger and food waste. Such is the case of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which has at the beginning of this year launched the UAE Food Bank.

Though it, the UAE has confirmed its political will to institutionally fight hunger and food waste, which will lead the regional efforts in managing food loss and food waste.

The newly established UAE Food Bank will gather many stakeholders to collect excess food from hotels, supermarkets, restaurants and farms. It will store and package the food for distribution, while inedible food will be recycled for different usages, including but not limited to animal feed and fertilisers.

Food waste has become a dangerous habit: about 1/3 of the food we produce globally (1.3 billion tonnes of the food every year) is lost or wasted

Food loss and waste in NENA are estimated at up to 250kg per person and over $60 billion USD annually. The social, economic, and environmental impacts are serious for a region which relies heavily on global food imports, has limited potential to increase food production, and faces scarcity of water and arable land. Reducing food losses and waste is vital for sustainable food systems and regional food security. Credit: FAO

Food loss and waste in Near East North Africa region is estimated at up to 250 kilogrammes per person and over 60 billion dollars annually, thus the reduction of food losses and waste is vital for sustainable food systems and regional food security.

Meanwhile, bad habits can change, global warming can be slowed down, also at the individual level.

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Deaths in Hills: Why and Howhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/deaths-in-hills-why-and-how/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=deaths-in-hills-why-and-how http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/deaths-in-hills-why-and-how/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 16:18:57 +0000 Minhaj Uddin and Prabir Das http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=151052 Hill cutting for illegal establishments is one of the key reasons behind the recent series of landslides in Rangamati, the worst in a decade that killed at least 120 people. Locals say, the green hills of Rangamati have been clawed all over and the trees, that keep the soil together, cleared to make pieces of […]

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By Minhaj Uddin and Prabir Das
Jun 23 2017 (The Daily Star, Bangladesh)

Hill cutting for illegal establishments is one of the key reasons behind the recent series of landslides in Rangamati, the worst in a decade that killed at least 120 people.

Locals say, the green hills of Rangamati have been clawed all over and the trees, that keep the soil together, cleared to make pieces of flat land for building houses.

Chakma King Debashish Roy, the representative of an ethnic community, says such construction is much different from the settlements of indigenous communities, which does not affect mountains.

“Such construction and engineering practices are not viable and sustainable in the hills,” he said.

Even after the series of landslide, The Daily Star has found numerous such settlements on the walls of clawed mountains in Rangamati, which experts say are in threat.

What is more interesting is the fact that most of these land are government lands, occupied illegally. Watch video to learn more:

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

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VIDEO: Yusra Mardini, A Young Refugee, Finds Safety in Her New Homehttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/video-yusra-mardini-young-refugee-finds-safety-new-home/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=video-yusra-mardini-young-refugee-finds-safety-new-home http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/video-yusra-mardini-young-refugee-finds-safety-new-home/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 16:21:56 +0000 UNHCR http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=151070 The United Nations Department of Public Information has launched a new animated video on the dramatic story of Yusra Mardini, a young refugee from conflict-torn Syria who achieved her dream to compete in the Olympics last year. Yusra Mardini was appointed as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN […]

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The United Nations Department of Public Information has launched a new animated video on the dramatic story of Yusra Mardini, a young refugee from conflict-torn Syria who achieved her dream to compete in the Olympics last year.

The United Nations Department of Public Information has launched a new animated video on the dramatic story of Yusra Mardini, a young refugee from conflict-torn Syria who achieved her dream to compete in the Olympics last year.

By UNHCR
UNITED NATIONS, Jun 20 2017 (IPS)

The United Nations Department of Public Information has launched a new animated video on the dramatic story of Yusra Mardini, a young refugee from conflict-torn Syria who achieved her dream to compete in the Olympics last year. Yusra Mardini was appointed as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) on 27 April 2017. The video was produced by the Education Outreach Section in support of the Together Initiative to mark World Refugee day on 20 June and highlight the advent of the International Day of Peace on 21 September.

 
 

 
 

Nearly 66 million people were forcibly displaced from their homes last year, the United Nation refugee agency has reported.  Around 20 people are newly displaced every minute of the day, according to a new report. In its annual Global Trends report, the UN’s refugee agency UNHCR has recorded unprecedented and concerning levels of displacement around the world.
The figure equates to “one person displaced every three seconds – less than the time it takes to read this sentence, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reports, stressing the “very high” pace at which conflict and persecution is forcing people to flee their homes.

“We are used to looking at the world and seeing progress, but there is no progress to be made in terms of conflict and violence that is producing people who have had to flee,” said the Director of UNHCR’s New York Office Ninette Kelley, ahead of World Refugee Day.

In just two decades, the population of forcibly displaced persons doubled from 32 million in 1997 to 65 million in 2016, larger than the total population of the United Kingdom.

Much of the growth was concentrated between 2012 and 2015, and driven largely by the Syrian conflict which, now in its seventh year, has forcibly displaced over 12 million representing over half of the Middle Eastern nation’s population.

 

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World Day to Combat Desertificationhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/world-day-to-combat-desertification/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=world-day-to-combat-desertification http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/world-day-to-combat-desertification/#respond Wed, 14 Jun 2017 11:54:10 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150878 Today’s world is facing an unprecedented level of human mobility and migration is high on the political agenda all over the world. The number of international migrants worldwide has continued to grow rapidly, surpassing 244 million in 2015,growing at a rate faster than the world’s population. Complex Links Behind these numbers are complex links that […]

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By IPS World Desk
ROME, Jun 14 2017 (IPS)

Today’s world is facing an unprecedented level of human mobility and migration is high on the political agenda all over the world.

The number of international migrants worldwide has continued to grow rapidly, surpassing 244 million in 2015,growing at a rate faster than the world’s population.

Complex Links

Behind these numbers are complex links that tie migration to the consequences of environmental degradation, political instability, food insecurity and poverty. Many flee their lands, while many rural communities feel left behind.

 

Migration and land degradation

The 2017 World Day to Combat Desertification (#2017WDCD) will look closely at the important link between migration and land degradation.  It will be the Day to remind everyone of the importance of productive land for assuring nutritious food, generating local employment and contributing to the sustainability, stability and security of places affected by desertification.

The challenges are dire and often the apparent lack of choice or loss of livelihoods can lead to hopelessness.  And yet productive land is a timeless tool for creating wealth.

Re-investment in rural lands

Monique Barbut, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, is calling for serious re-investment in rural lands so they can contribute to productive rather than negative trends.

Robust and sustained investment in rural lands can create local jobs and give households and communities a fighting chance to thrive. That in turn will strengthen national security and future prospects for sustainability.

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5 Devastating Cyclones in Bangladeshhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/5-devastating-cyclones-in-bangladesh/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-devastating-cyclones-in-bangladesh http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/5-devastating-cyclones-in-bangladesh/#respond Tue, 30 May 2017 05:56:33 +0000 Star Online Report http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150671 Bangladesh, the delta country, has been in the line of a few devastating tropical cyclones. In their trail, the cyclones have left behind complete chaos, death and despair. As the country learns to adapt and respond to this natural disaster more efficiently, we take a look back at some of the worst tropical cyclones to […]

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By Star Online Report
May 30 2017 (The Daily Star, Bangladesh)

Bangladesh, the delta country, has been in the line of a few devastating tropical cyclones. In their trail, the cyclones have left behind complete chaos, death and despair. As the country learns to adapt and respond to this natural disaster more efficiently, we take a look back at some of the worst tropical cyclones to have hit the country.

 
1970 Bhola cyclone

Landfall: November 12, 1970

Casualty: More than 500,000

Affected areas: Chittagong, Barguna, Khepupara, Patuakhali, north of Char Burhanuddin, Char Tazumuddin and south of Maijdi, Haringhata

Damages: More than 400,000 houses and 3,500 educational institutions were destroyed

 

1991 cyclone

Landfall: April 29, 1991

Casualty: 150,000

Affected areas: Chittagong district of southeastern Bangladesh

Damages: As many as 10 million people became homeless

 

Cyclone Sidr

Landfall: November 15, 2007

Casualty: Up to 10,000, according to Red Crescent Society

Affected areas: Bagerhat, Barisal, Patuakhali, Pirojpur, Khulna and Satkhira

Damages: Livestock, farms and feeds worth more than Tk 130 crore were destroyed

 

Cyclone Aila

Landfall: May 25, 2009

Casualty: 190

Affected areas: Southwestern coastal regions of Bangladesh

Damages: 6,000 kilometres of roads damaged, more than 500,000 people became homeless, complete destruction of 275 primary schools and damage to 1,942 schools

 

Cyclone Roanu

Landfall: May 21, 2016

Casualty: 26

Most affected areas: Sandwip, Hatia, Kutubdia, Sitakundu and Feni

Damages: Around one lakh houses were damaged and about 150,000 families were affected

 

Sources:
Information taken from various sources including UNICEF and Red Crescent Society

Photos: AFP and file photos

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

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Change Maker: The Good Shepherdhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/change-maker-the-good-shepherd/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=change-maker-the-good-shepherd http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/change-maker-the-good-shepherd/#respond Wed, 17 May 2017 19:31:04 +0000 Aklakur Rahman Akash http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150500 Wife of runaway husband in Savar rewrites her fortune rearing sheep

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Farida Khatun among her sheep in Savar on the outskirts of the capital. She turned her fortunes around with sheep farming after her husband left her. The photo was taken recently. Photo: Palash Khan

By Aklakur Rahman Akash
May 17 2017 (The Daily Star, Bangladesh)

Two months into her pregnancy, Farida Khatun suffered a fate all too familiar yet often glossed over; her husband, Atar Mia, left her and went off to marry another woman. Given this was sometime in the early 80s, Farida Khatun could have been forgiven for resigning to a future full of gloom. But like the rose that grows from concrete, Farida’s resilience would spur her on to blossom to not only survive the odds stacked against her but resoundingly conquer them. And all that with a lamb purchased for Tk 80.

It is now hard to believe how Farida Khatun, 50, redefined her fate, along with prevailing stereotypes of gender roles. Initially, she began living with her parents and gave birth to her son, Babul Hosen. Her parents often tried to convince her to remarry. They thought this would be the only way to ensure a bright future for their daughter. But Farida Khatun was determined to not rely on another man, especially with her newly born son’s future in the balance.

It was in 1985 that her brother, Abul Hossen, bought a lamb for Tk 80 and gave it to her. Back then, Farida’s son was only two years old. Her brother’s gift was given in the hopes of offering his sister some sustainability for her future. He had probably never imagined that it would end up with her one day becoming the proud owner of a sheep farm.

During a recent visit to Kumarkhoda Ashrayan Project in Savar, where Farida Khatun currently lives, The Daily Star correspondent found her in her farm, surrounded by 49 sheep. All this that stood before her today started with that one lamb. “When my husband left me, I was only 17 years old. Still, I wanted to do something on my own. But all I had was just a calf of a sheep. So I had to start with that,” Farida says.

While Farida’s tenacity itself is praiseworthy, her compassion for her sheep is an even more compelling aspect of her story. Without any formal training and 2.5 decimals of land only, Farida still went to work with a purpose. She turned the veranda adjacent to her room sheep shed. Every evening, the sheep enter the shed and sleep till 10:00am, in close proximity to Farida and under her watchful eyes.

Every morning, Farida herself takes her sheep out into the fields to graze and returns to join them after lunch. “I have been doing so for the past 32 years,” she says. Salina Begum, Farida’s daughter in law, explains the depths of her mother-in-law’s compassion. “If any sheep is found dead, she goes into mourning and refuses to eat. It’s like a member of her family has passed,” she says. Salina also adds that even the sale of a sheep plunges her mother-in-law into melancholy. The sheep, in return, give her their outright loyalty. “The sheep follow her wherever she goes,” Salina says adding that Farida will rear sheep till the last breath because they are what gave her a new lease of life.

oday, Farida is a successful entrepreneur who inspires others around her. Razea Begum, one of her neighbours, also recently bought a pair of female sheep from Farida for Tk 6000 and is now also daring to dream. “I want to change my fortune like Farida,” Razea says. Salma Begum, another neighbour, also aspires to rear sheep. “Before I used to pass a lot of free time. Now I am trying to follow in Farida Apa’s footsteps,” she says. While Farida Khatun has become a trailblazer and an inspiration, she has not forgotten what began it all. Her son, now all grown up and a father of three lovely children, has his own flower business but Farida continues to bear all the costs of her family.

“I bear the education cost of my grand-children too. I even bought my daughter-in-law gold ornaments for her hands, ears and neck,” Farida says, laughing. Her laughter is raw. It is pure and it sounds like it had been waiting for a long time. Farida doesn’t look back on what once was any longer. She looks forward and she sees positivity. Circumstances can change if one has the will and the support system to change them. Farida had both and now she stands as a testament to what can be done when a human spirit refuses to break, stereotypes be damned.

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

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Unlocking the Diaspora Development Potentialhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/unlocking-the-diaspora-development-potential/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=unlocking-the-diaspora-development-potential http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/05/unlocking-the-diaspora-development-potential/#respond Fri, 12 May 2017 13:11:47 +0000 Elena Pasquini http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150417 ‘Diaspora is the biggest development community that exists in the world’, according to Pedro De Vasconcelos, manager of IFAD‘s Financial Facility for Remittances. However, its potential is still largely untapped. In 2015, over 200 million migrants sent home about 450 billion dollars in remittances. An amount which is three times the official development assistance and […]

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By Elena L. Pasquini
ROME, May 12 2017 (degrees of latitude)

‘Diaspora is the biggest development community that exists in the world’, according to Pedro De Vasconcelos, manager of IFAD‘s Financial Facility for Remittances. However, its potential is still largely untapped.

In 2015, over 200 million migrants sent home about 450 billion dollars in remittances. An amount which is three times the official development assistance and exceeds foreign direct investments in most countries. Recent estimates by the World Bank suggest a decline of 2.4 percent in 2016, whilst a growth of 3.3 percent is expected in 2017.

De Vasconcelos strongly believes that the money migrants send back to their home countries can be leveraged to stimulate investments, boost development and pull people out of poverty.

How to exploit migration-related inflow of capital to spur growth and build prosperity? Reducing transaction costs is not enough to, according to De Vasconcelos. Migrants and their families need financial inclusion, which is access to basic financial services, such as payments, savings, including current accounts, credit and insurance. Senders and recipients of remittances need options to the cash-to-cash system.

Where cash is king

A World Bank and IFAD report indicates that ‘two billion or 38 per cent of working-age adults globally have no access to financial services delivered by regulated financial institutions, with 73 per cent of poor people unbanked’. However, millions of them receive remittances.

‘The reason they are not banked is because those who provide financial services think that these people are poor and have no money. That’s it’, De Vasconcelos told Degrees of Latitude in an exclusive interview.

That’s a ‘cliché’, he said. They get regularly what is equivalent to a monthly salary. ‘The majority of them want financial democracy, [but] they are living in a world where cash is king… They are equipped to some extent, with a little more of help, to be part of a financial democratic revolution’, he added. ‘Give them the options and see if cash remains king’.

When remittances received through regulated financial institutions, families plan for long-term investment goals, savings can be reinvested in the local community and they can “function as a buffer against instability at the macroeconomic level”, according to IFAD and World Bank. ‘Think of you’, without a banking account where to credit wages, without a credit card, no access to online banking services or without a credit history: ‘What do you do? You are going back to cash and hopefully you have it, but that’s it. How can you leverage anything? What you are having in your hands is what you have and what you will get’, De Vasconcelos said.

In the agricultural sector, for instance, financial institutions do not provide services or loans to farmers on the assumption that agriculture is a risky business without taking into consideration the remittances they receive. ‘Financial institutions just don’t see the opportunities that exist [with remittances]’, he said. ‘It is a sector of complete missed opportunity over missed opportunity … and it’s not just doing good, doing the right thing, it’s a win-win situation.’

De Vasconcelos has no doubt: ‘Financial inclusion is the biggest opportunity that exists.’

Learning, saving and investing

Financial inclusion requires the implementation of strategies to let offer and demand meet each other. Families need financial literacy to manage financial services, but financial institutions need to understand that banking senders and recipients of remittances is possible.

With the Financial Facility for Remittances established ten years ago, IFAD aims at testing mechanisms for accessing remittances in rural areas, but also promoting investment and entrepreneurship, as well as diaspora engagement in their countries of origin. ‘We are a laboratory’, De Vasconcelos said. ‘We saw dramatic changes’ testing new financial products with financial literacy programmes.

In Sri-Lanka, for instance, a project in collaboration with the Hatton National Bank helped senders and recipients gain access to financial services. The bank designed an account targeted for the migrants’ needs, linking savings to remittances and then providing housing or business loans. After the pilot, demand increased and Hatton Bank opened several branches offering remittance services.

In Italy, IFAD engaged Philippine diaspora with a training to learn how to budget, manage daily expenses, and increase savings. ‘That was a paradigm change … Now that [they] have saved, that know how to save, we showed that there are other options … Don’t give the money away, maybe you can invest.’ Many decided to actually invest in agricultural businesses in their communities.

Scaling up

IFAD’s projects are pilots designed to show what works and what doesn’t. Scaling up requires the involvement of multiple actors, from private sector to governments, and the mainstreaming of remittances into the programmes of many international organizations, according to De Vasconcelos. ‘Ministries of agricultures, [for instance]. It is imperative they understand that their target groups receive remittances. And the majority of them not even know or care. They think that it’s not their problem’, he said.

On 16 June, the International Day of Family Remittances will be celebrated at the United Nations headquarters, in the context of the fifth Global Forum on Remittances just one month before the High-Level Political Forum that will assess the advancement in the implementation of the first 10 Sustainable Development Goals. ‘…. If you want to achieve the SDGs, you have to look at this phenomenon that is affecting one out of ten people in planet.… One remittance affects five people on average’, De Vasconcelos stressed.

Maybe remittances are not the silver bullet, but while policymakers try to find solutions on ‘how to transform billion into trillions, and that’s what you need to achieve the goals’, migrants have sent trillions of dollars back home, according to De Vasconcelos. ‘Can you maximise that dollar when they send it? Can you try to make that dollar convert into two … by offering more options? You could do that. That’s the beautiful part of this story, it’s not a question of money for once. It’s a question of will, it’s [the] question of facilitating. The money is there, what you need is just the actors to make it happened’, he said.

‘Remittances are tricky’, De Vasconcelos noted. The risk of doing nothing, of remaining in a cash-to-cash system is to keep families dependent on what they receive from abroad.

This story was originally published by Degrees of Latitude

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FEATURED VIDEO: Searching for Solutions to Disaster Risk Managementhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/searching-for-solutions-to-disaster-risk-management/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=searching-for-solutions-to-disaster-risk-management http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/searching-for-solutions-to-disaster-risk-management/#respond Sun, 30 Apr 2017 10:29:29 +0000 Desmond Brown http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150313 Climate change remains inextricably linked to the challenges of disaster risk reduction (DRR). And according to the head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), Robert Glasser, the reduction of greenhouse gases is “the single most urgent global disaster risk treatment”. Glasser was addressing the Fifth Regional Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction […]

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By Desmond Brown
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 30 2017 (IPS)

Climate change remains inextricably linked to the challenges of disaster risk reduction (DRR). And according to the head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), Robert Glasser, the reduction of greenhouse gases is “the single most urgent global disaster risk treatment”.

Glasser was addressing the Fifth Regional Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) in the Americas. Held recently in Montreal, the gathering included more than 1,000 delegates from 50 countries, including the Caribbean.
Head of the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) Ronald Jackson, who was a panelist in a forum discussing the linkages between disaster risk reduction, climate change and sustainable development, said the region needs to marry its indigenous solutions to disaster risk management with modern technology.

 

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FEATURED VIDEO: Harnessing the Eco Superpowers of Bamboohttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-harnessing-the-eco-superpowers-of-bamboo/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=featured-video-harnessing-the-eco-superpowers-of-bamboo http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-harnessing-the-eco-superpowers-of-bamboo/#respond Fri, 28 Apr 2017 12:39:15 +0000 Desmond Brown http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150192 The bamboo plant can be found in abundance in several Caribbean countries, but the director of the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), Dr. Hans Friederich, says its importance in dealing with climate change has been missed by many of these countries. “Bamboo and rattan, to a lesser extent, have been in a way […]

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Bamboo sequesters carbon at rates comparable to or greater than many tree species.

Bamboo sequesters carbon at rates comparable to or greater than many tree species.

By Desmond Brown
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 28 2017 (IPS)

The bamboo plant can be found in abundance in several Caribbean countries, but the director of the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), Dr. Hans Friederich, says its importance in dealing with climate change has been missed by many of these countries.
“Bamboo and rattan, to a lesser extent, have been in a way forgotten as mechanisms that can help countries both with mitigation of climate change and with adaptation. And I think, certainly for the Caribbean, for Jamaica, both aspects are important,” Friederich told IPS.

“Mitigation, because carbon is sequestered by bamboo. It is a plant, it does photosynthesis, but it happens to be the fastest growing plant in the world so the absorption of CO2 by bamboo forests is quite significant.”

INBAR has facilitated a trip to China for a group of Jamaicans to show them how the Chinese are using bamboo as a source of energy, as a charcoal source – to replicate that intelligence and that experience in Jamaica and help the island develop a bamboo industry.

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Video message by UN Secretary-General António Guterres on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day 2017http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/video-message-by-un-secretary-general-antonio-on-the-occasion-of-world-press-freedom-day-2017/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=video-message-by-un-secretary-general-antonio-on-the-occasion-of-world-press-freedom-day-2017 http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/video-message-by-un-secretary-general-antonio-on-the-occasion-of-world-press-freedom-day-2017/#respond Fri, 28 Apr 2017 09:01:36 +0000 UNESCO http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150180 Video message by UN Secretary-General António Guterres on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day 2017

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UN Secretary-General António Guterres

UN Secretary-General António Guterres

By UNESCO
UNITED NATIONS, Apr 28 2017 (IPS)

Video message by UN Secretary-General António Guterres on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day 2017

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FEATURED VIDEO: World Press Freedom Day 2017http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-world-press-freedom-day-2017/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=featured-video-world-press-freedom-day-2017 http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-world-press-freedom-day-2017/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 08:14:32 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150126 Journalists are not only major users of the cherished right to freedom of expression but also symbols of the extent to which a society tolerates and promotes freedom of expression. The current state of safety of journalists worldwide is alarming. Over the last decade 827 journalists and media workers have been killed. Even more alarming […]

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Over the last decade 827 journalists and media workers have been killed. Even more alarming is the fact that in less than one out of ten cases have the perpetrators been apprehended.

Over the last decade 827 journalists and media workers have been killed. Even more alarming is the fact that in less than one out of ten cases have the perpetrators been apprehended.

By IPS World Desk
ROME, Apr 25 2017 (IPS)

Journalists are not only major users of the cherished right to freedom of expression but also symbols of the extent to which a society tolerates and promotes freedom of expression. The current state of safety of journalists worldwide is alarming. Over the last decade 827 journalists and media workers have been killed. Even more alarming is the fact that in less than one out of ten cases have the perpetrators been apprehended.

Judicial systems worldwide need to be strengthened with a key focus on protecting freedom of expression and the safety of journalists.

Even in this emerging world of technology and digital accessibility, we remain handcuffed by the inconvenience of facts. While the digital era has enhanced access to information, facilitating exchange as well as intercultural dialogue, the rise of online hate speech shows that digital technologies also bring a number of challenges. One of these is striking the right balance between freedom of expression online and respect for equality and human dignity.

The media can provide a platform for a multitude of voices and perspectives to help strengthen tolerance, dialogue and critical thinking. They can also offer counter narratives to challenge the ideas promoted in violent extremism narratives.

Let us be mindful: the role of the media is only as strong as the desire for truth.

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FEATURED VIDEO: Investing in a Clean, Green Futurehttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/investing-in-a-clean-green-future/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=investing-in-a-clean-green-future http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/investing-in-a-clean-green-future/#respond Thu, 20 Apr 2017 01:28:31 +0000 Desmond Brown http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150017 From tourism-dependent nations like Barbados to those rich with natural resources like Guyana, climate change poses one of the biggest challenges for the countries of the Caribbean – and it hasn’t gone unnoticed by the region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB). “We are giving high priority to redressing the fallout from climate […]

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President of the Caribbean Development Bank Dr. Warren Smith says the bank is giving high priority to addressing the fallout from climate change in the region. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

President of the Caribbean Development Bank Dr. Warren Smith says the bank is giving high priority to addressing the fallout from climate change in the region. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

By Desmond Brown
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Apr 20 2017 (IPS)

From tourism-dependent nations like Barbados to those rich with natural resources like Guyana, climate change poses one of the biggest challenges for the countries of the Caribbean – and it hasn’t gone unnoticed by the region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB).

“We are giving high priority to redressing the fallout from climate change,” says the bank’s president Dr. Warren Smith. “This is an inescapable reality, and we have made it our business to put in place the financial resources necessary to redress the effects of sea-level rise and more dangerous hurricanes.”

CDB has also tapped new funding for renewable energy and for energy efficiency.

For the first time, the bank has accessed a 33-million-dollar credit facility from Agence Française de Développement (AFD) to support sustainable infrastructure projects in select Caribbean countries and a 3 million euro grant to finance feasibility studies for projects eligible for financing under the credit facility.

“At least 50 percent of those funds will be used for climate adaptation and mitigation projects,” Smith explained.

 

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FEATURED VIDEO: CDB Partners with the Caribbean in Climate Change Fighthttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-cdb-partners-with-the-caribbean-in-climate-change-fight/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=featured-video-cdb-partners-with-the-caribbean-in-climate-change-fight http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/04/featured-video-cdb-partners-with-the-caribbean-in-climate-change-fight/#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:58:52 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=150075 With numerous challenges brought on by climate change, Caribbean countries are facing a dilemma. In Jamaica for example, the agriculture and water sectors are under increasing threat. The region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), has been partnering with countries in the climate change fight.  The bank’s President, Dr. Warren Smith, said they […]

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From tourism-dependent nations like Barbados to those rich with natural resources like Guyana, climate change poses one of the biggest challenges for the countries of the Caribbean – and it hasn’t gone unnoticed by the region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB).

From tourism-dependent nations like Barbados to those rich with natural resources like Guyana, climate change poses one of the biggest challenges for the countries of the Caribbean – and it hasn’t gone unnoticed by the region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB).

By IPS World Desk
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Apr 18 2017 (IPS)

With numerous challenges brought on by climate change, Caribbean countries are facing a dilemma. In Jamaica for example, the agriculture and water sectors are under increasing threat.

The region’s premier financial institution, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), has been partnering with countries in the climate change fight.  The bank’s President, Dr. Warren Smith, said they are giving high priority to redressing the fallout from climate change.

 

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VIDEO: Raising Autism Consciousnesshttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/raising-autism-consciousness/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=raising-autism-consciousness http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/raising-autism-consciousness/#comments Wed, 29 Mar 2017 10:54:58 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=149692 On the 2nd of April, to observe World Autism Awareness Day, IPS will be highlighting the issues and plight surrounding the rising global phenomenon of this often misunderstood affliction that is consuming many of the world’s children.     Read IPS coverage of World Autism Awareness Day      

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By IPS World Desk
Mar 29 2017 (IPS)

On the 2nd of April, to observe World Autism Awareness Day, IPS will be highlighting the issues and plight surrounding the rising global phenomenon of this often misunderstood affliction that is consuming many of the world’s children.

 

 

Read IPS coverage of World Autism Awareness Day

 

 

 

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FEATURED VIDEO: World Water Dayhttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/featured-video-world-water-day/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=featured-video-world-water-day http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/featured-video-world-water-day/#comments Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:26:23 +0000 IPS World Desk http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=149550 World Water Day on March 22nd gives us an opportunity to reflect on the one simple truth: water is life.   Globally, over 80% of the wastewater generated by society flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused.  Today, 1.8 billion people use a source of drinking water contaminated with faeces, putting them […]

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683 million people still lack improved drinking water sources.

683 million people still lack improved drinking water sources.

By IPS World Desk
ROME, Mar 22 2017 (IPS)

World Water Day on March 22nd gives us an opportunity to reflect on the one simple truth: water is life.

 

Globally, over 80% of the wastewater generated by society flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused.  Today, 1.8 billion people use a source of drinking water contaminated with faeces, putting them at risk of contracting cholera, dysentery, typhoid and polio.

Read IPS coverage of World Water Day

 

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Islam and Christianity the Great Convergence: Working jointly towards equal citizenship rightshttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/islam-and-christianity-the-great-convergence-working-jointly-towards-equal-citizenship-rights/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=islam-and-christianity-the-great-convergence-working-jointly-towards-equal-citizenship-rights http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/03/islam-and-christianity-the-great-convergence-working-jointly-towards-equal-citizenship-rights/#respond Wed, 15 Mar 2017 14:52:05 +0000 binTalal http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=149433 Message of His Royal Highness Prince Hassan bin Talal of the Hachemite Kingdom of Jordan Dear friends, distinguished participants, The peace of God in the world, as it was put in the Brussels Declaration, is essentially what we seek when we speak about the participation of human capital: it is not only the peace of […]

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His Royal Highness Prince Hassan bin Talal of the Hachemite Kingdom of Jordan

His Royal Highness Prince Hassan bin Talal of the Hachemite Kingdom of Jordan

By His Royal Highness Prince Hassan bin Talal
Mar 15 2017 (Geneva Centre)

Message of His Royal Highness Prince Hassan bin Talal of the Hachemite Kingdom of Jordan

Dear friends, distinguished participants,

The peace of God in the world, as it was put in the Brussels Declaration, is essentially what we seek when we speak about the participation of human capital: it is not only the peace of God, but it is also the peace of God’s children that we attempt to build, by speaking of a “levelling”, that is to say, of universal citizenship with universal values shared by all. Let us look at those values for a moment.

The fundamental common element about monotheistic religions is faith and confidence in the good, human-loving, compassionate, and merciful God. All of our religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam consider justice and peace as gifts and blessings from God. All of our religions disapprove of religious justification of violence and inhumane actions, none of them approve of violence, terrorism or ill treatment of human beings. The Brussels Declaration unfortunately has not been heeded and that is why we are meeting here today, to say once again, in the spirit of Judaism, “What is hateful to you do not do to your fellow man – this is the entire law, all the rest is commentary. “ Christianity has the tradition of “all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them for this is the law of the Prophet.”

In this context I would like to emphasize the importance of Islam as the third and youngest of the Abrahamic family of faiths, embodying ethical codes to which both Jews and Christians and likewise subscribe in spirit. The Holy Qur’an and the Prophet’s hadiths are clear in the regulation of human relations and reciprocal responsibilities. When asked, the Holy Prophet is quoted in saying “What is the rule of Islam? What is the best thing in Islam? And the answer was: to feed the hungry, to give the greeting of peace both to those one knows and to those one does not know.”

Why are we going to emphasize the levelling of citizenship? I would suggest that for education to stand a realistic chance of achieving its desired goals of ultimately fostering better relations and enlightened outreach among faith groups, Jewish, Christian and Muslim, the oft espoused theory that mutual knowledge cures all, is clearly not enough; that to know is to love, mutual awareness and knowledge is what we would dearly promote were it not for the confrontation among co-religionists and co-nationalists. Incidentally, I believe in patriotism – loving your country; but nationalism as in loving your country at the expense of another, is what has happened in the Caucuses for instance, when Christian Russia backed Muslim Abkhazia against Christian Georgia, when Muslim Iran played off Christian Armenia against Muslim Azerbaijan. The list continues as you all well know, Ossetians against Georgians, both Christians, Lezgins against Azeri, both Muslim and so forth. My question to you and to myself is: do we not need to highlight the twin poles of the problem, the problem of us and the Other? What about these conflicts? Where are the lines of antagonism? Do they not always correspond to religious divisions? Is there an imperative of conducting not only interfaith, but also intra-faith discourse? I would suggest that citizenship is about values that apply not to, with all the respect, brand names, but apply to promoting creative commons, based on shared values.

And in that sense, I do wish that such an initiative today could lead somewhere down the road – next year is one hundred years since Versailles:  can you imagine a Versailles in 2018 that emphasizes the importance of a survey of our sources, for any chosen time period, of literature, fiction and nonfiction, mass communication, textbooks – of course, today we have civil society actively tweeting. Is there a knowledge base, a compassion of knowledge base for such tweets? Can we create a knowledge base and analyse it through regional symposia? Can we move in terms of a new twin pole, and that is not the binary twin pole, but the regional, greater good of the greater number, between West and East? We have this monolith, and I think the time has come to speak about North and South. From the Baltic to the Black Sea, from the Black Sea to the Levant, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Adriatic, all of this constitutes the cradle of civilization, and of course the  relationship between the haves and the have-nots, the black and the green, the hydrocarbons and the fertile crescent. In this spirit, I salute you and look forward to your recommendations.

 

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Man Who Planted 50,000 Treeshttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/02/man-who-planted-50000-trees/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=man-who-planted-50000-trees http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/02/man-who-planted-50000-trees/#respond Sat, 25 Feb 2017 14:29:34 +0000 Star Online Report http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=149137 Abdus Samad Sheikh, 60, cannot sleep peacefully at night if he doesn’t plant a tree every day. Samad, who lives in Vagondanga village in Aliabad union in Faridpur Sadar upazila has planted around 50,000 trees over the past 48 years. A nature lover by passion, Samad earns around Tk 100 every day by pulling rickshaw […]

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By Star Online Report
Feb 25 2017 (The Daily Star, Bangladesh)

Abdus Samad Sheikh, 60, cannot sleep peacefully at night if he doesn’t plant a tree every day.

Samad, who lives in Vagondanga village in Aliabad union in Faridpur Sadar upazila has planted around 50,000 trees over the past 48 years. A nature lover by passion, Samad earns around Tk 100 every day by pulling rickshaw in Faridpur, which he spends on buying essentials for his family and at least one plant a day.

To know more about this passionate tree lover watch the video from Star Live!

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

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Zimbabwe: Widows Deprived of Property Rightshttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/zimbabwe-widows-deprived-of-property-rights/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=zimbabwe-widows-deprived-of-property-rights http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/zimbabwe-widows-deprived-of-property-rights/#respond Tue, 24 Jan 2017 15:29:50 +0000 Human Rights Watch http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=148648 Property Grabbing Leaves Many Older Women Destitute

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By Human Rights Watch
HARARE, Jan 24 2017 (Human Rights Watch)

Widows in Zimbabwe are routinely evicted from their homes and land, and their property is stolen by in-laws when their husbands die, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The government of Zimbabwe should urgently take steps to protect widows from this practice.

The 52-page report, “‘You Will Get Nothing,’ Violations of Property and Inheritance Rights of Widows in Zimbabwe,” found that in-laws often tell women shortly after the deaths of their husbands that the relatives intend to take over the homes and lands or other property where the husband and wife had lived for decades. One widow quoted her brother-in-law’s words to her after her husband’s funeral, in front of the family that had gathered: “He said in my face, ‘You are rubbish and you will get nothing. I am taking everything.’”

“The impact of property grabbing on widows is devastating,” said Bethany Brown, a researcher at Human Rights Watch and author of the report. “Women whose property was taken from them spoke of homelessness, destitution, and loss of livelihoods.”

Based on interviews with 59 widows in all 10 provinces of Zimbabwe between May and October 2016, this report documents the human rights vulnerabilities and abuses that widows in Zimbabwe face.

In 2013, Zimbabwe adopted a new constitution that provides for equal rights for women, including for inheritance and property. In practice, however, existing laws only apply to widows in officially registered marriages. Estimates are that most marriages in Zimbabwe are conducted under customary law and are not registered, so, in effect, these laws afford no protection from property-grabbing relatives.

Many widows described how they face insurmountable obstacles defending their property or taking legal steps to reclaim it. Fending off relatives while mourning their husbands and selling off productive assets like cattle to afford court fees and transportation were just some of the challenges. Once in court, widows said they were at a disadvantage without an official record of their marriage if it was a customary union. Courts look to the in-laws – the very people who stand to gain – to confirm the marriage, putting widows at the mercy of their husband’s family.

Nearly all of the widows interviewed for the report who successfully challenged efforts by in-laws to take over their property had benefited from legal services offered by organizations like the Legal Resources Foundation, and Women and Law in Southern Africa Research and Education Trust, Zimbabwe.

Older widows described feeling that the loss of their homes and the fields they had worked on with their husbands was catastrophic, as they had no time or energy to rebuild a lifetime of work. Many struggled to support themselves when their main source of livelihood, their land, had been taken from them.

Human Rights Watch conducted this research as part of an effort to map the vulnerabilities of older people to human rights abuses. With the rapid growth of older populations worldwide, there is a growing need to understand how discrimination, ageism, neglect, and abuse affect older people and what steps governments should take to protect their rights. By 2050, an estimated two billion people – almost a quarter of the world’s population – will be over age 60. The majority will be women. Widows face varying challenges in different countries and cultural settings. Property grabbing can be common in the Southern Africa region, and many older women have few other economic options. Widows of all ages are at risk of property grabbing and its grave harmful impacts.

Some of those interviewed said their in-laws simply forced them out of their homes immediately after their husbands died. Others said their in-laws threatened, physically intimidated, and insulted them to make them leave. In some cases, distant relatives of the deceased showed up years later and took over their property.

Many women did not know that they had a right to the property they held with their spouses. Others said they were wary of jeopardizing relationships with in-laws with whom they had shared their lives for many years, and who they had hoped would support them and their children.

According to the 2012 census, Zimbabwe is home to about 587,000 widows, and most women 60 and over are widowed. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that at least 70 percent of women in rural areas are in unregistered customary unions and are living under customary law.

“The government should take immediate steps to register all marriages, including customary unions, reform its marriage laws, and raise awareness of the property rights of widows,” said Brown. “That would help protect thousands of women each year against the injustice of being summarily thrown out of their homes when they become widows.”

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Beekeeping in Chalanbeel Gains Popularity among Pabna, Sirajganj Farmershttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/beekeeping-in-chalanbeel-gains-popularity-among-pabna-sirajganj-farmers/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=beekeeping-in-chalanbeel-gains-popularity-among-pabna-sirajganj-farmers http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/beekeeping-in-chalanbeel-gains-popularity-among-pabna-sirajganj-farmers/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:29:24 +0000 Ahmed Humayun http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=148600 From time immemorial, honey is popularly known as the best cure for hundreds of diseases. Yet, we rarely allow bees to make hives, in which they store the honey they produce from nectar of flowers, around our houses. However, it appears that the trend has changed, or at least that is the case in the […]

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By Ahmed Humayun Kabir Topu
Jan 20 2017 (The Daily Star, Bangladesh)

From time immemorial, honey is popularly known as the best cure for hundreds of diseases.

Yet, we rarely allow bees to make hives, in which they store the honey they produce from nectar of flowers, around our houses.

However, it appears that the trend has changed, or at least that is the case in the Chalanbeel areas of Pabna and Sirajganj over the last decade, where bees can now make their hives near the crop fields as beekeeping or apiculture gains popularity among the farmers.

Apiculture helps to meet the growing demand for honey as more and more people are learning of its goodness, and also increasing the crop production as bees are a great aid in pollination.

During winter, mustard fields see a high yield of honey collected from the hives and also a bumper harvest of mustard by the boon of the practice of apiculture in the region, according to agriculture officials.

This year, between 2500 to 3000 metric tons of honey is likely to be collected from around 50 thousand special bee boxes set up in over 60 thousand hectares of mustard field in the Chalanbeel regions of Pabna and Sirajganj, said Md Khoyer Uddin, additional deputy director of Department of Agriculture Extension (DAE), Pabna.

During winter, mustard fields see a high yield of honey collected from the hives and also a bumper harvest of mustard by the boon of the practice of apiculture in the region, according to agriculture officials. Photo: Star

During winter, mustard fields see a high yield of honey collected from the hives and also a bumper harvest of mustard by the boon of the practice of apiculture in the region, according to agriculture officials. Photo: Star

This is the highest honey producing zone across the country, he also said.

“Mustard farmers earlier used pesticide to make mustard field free from pest attack, now they have left using pesticide in mustard field due to the bee keeping, which increases production by 15 to 20 percent,” the DAE deputy director of Pabna added.

Bees collect the nectar from mustard flowers when they fully blossom in the fields, and process the nectar into honey in the honeycomb-laden bee boxes. The bee keepers then collect the honey from the boxes. The process also facilitates the transfer of pollens among mustard flowers, giving rise to a high yield.

Bees collect the nectar from mustard flowers when they fully blossom in the fields, and process the nectar into honey in the honeycomb-laden bee boxes. Photo: Star

Bees collect the nectar from mustard flowers when they fully blossom in the fields, and process the nectar into honey in the honeycomb-laden bee boxes. Photo: Star

“Around 800 beekeepers from different parts of the country rush to the Chalanbeel region of Pabna and Sirajganj in winter to get the vast yellow mustard field for collecting honey,” Jahangir Alam Modhu, president of a bee keepers’ association in northern region, told The Daily Star.

The beekeepers set their bee boxes on the crop fields from mid-November targeting to collect honey till May, he also said adding that besides mustard, honey is also produced from the nectar of flowers of other winter crops including kalo jeera among others.

“Mustard field is suitable for honey production than any other winter crops. I have set 300 boxes in one bigha field in Noubaria village under Vangura upazila in Pabna couple of weeks ago and got 2000 kilogrammes of honey,” said Md Aslam Sardar, a bee keeper in the area.

This story was originally published by The Daily Star, Bangladesh

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PKSF: Coordinated and Sustainable Developmenthttp://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/pksf-coordinated-and-sustainable-development/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pksf-coordinated-and-sustainable-development http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/01/pksf-coordinated-and-sustainable-development/#respond Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:50:58 +0000 Editor PKSF http://www.ipsnews.net/?p=148481   This video was originally published by PKSF, Bangladesh

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By Editor, PKSF Bangladesh
Jan 11 2017 (PKSF Bangladesh)

 

This video was originally published by PKSF, Bangladesh

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