International Monetary Fund

Greek Privatisation of Key Sectors Meets Strong Opposition

Plans by the Greek government to sell companies that handle the key resources of energy and water face serious obstacles and its policy to offer investors exceptional privileges in an effort to boost interest in privatisation is coming under strong pressure.

Dreaming Big – But Who Will Fund Southern Africa’s Infrastructure Plans?

Mounds of sand and rubble are what are left of sections of Maputo’s beachfront road as bulldozers, manned by Chinese construction workers, tear up the road that is being rebuilt. Southern Africa is under construction and the reminders are everywhere.

Egypt’s Political Instability Taking Toll on Its Economy

Regardless of who is responsible for Egypt's current political impasse – be it the administration of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi or an aggressive secular opposition – local experts are certain of at least one fact: Egypt's dire economic circumstances will not improve without political stability.

Malawi’s President Faces a Crisis of Confidence

She has taken a personal pay cut, promised reforms, resumed aid flows from Western donors and put her predecessor’s private jet up for sale.

Creditors’ Stalemate Brings Greece to Knife Edge

Ignoring the thousands of protestors gathered outside the Greek parliament on Wednesday, the government voted in public spending cuts amounting to 17 billion dollars in an economy already on its knees from a lacerated budget.

Money for Salt: How the Country of the Young Is Failing Its Elderly

Carolina Poalo strikes the dry earth over and over with her hoe, her frail body bent almost double. She is determined to begin planting. During the long, dry season in Mozambique, she and her two young grandchildren have eaten little but cassava leaves.

With Egyptian Loan Request, Some Fear Loss of Revolution’s Gains

After 18 months of talks, on Wednesday Egypt's government formally requested a 4.8-billion-dollar loan from the Washington-based International Monetary Fund (IMF), hoping to stabilise an economy that has continued to badly stutter in the aftermath of the popular uprising that led to the downfall of former President Hosni Mubarak.

Teachers’ Strike Does Not Mean Political Liberation for Swaziland

Swazis should not see the ongoing nationwide one-month teachers’ strike as a movement capable of overthrowing the political regime here, despite the fact that civil servants and nurses have joined the action, according to political analyst Dr. Sikelela Dlamini.

Grim News for Caribbean Economies

For yet another occasion, it was not the good news Caribbean leaders wanted to hear.

A group of farmers queuing to buy fertiliser outside a shop in Bvumbwe, southern Malawi after the local currency was devalued. / Credit:Claire Ngozo A group of farmers queuing to buy fertiliser outside a shop in Bvumbwe, southern Malawi after the local currency was devalued. Credit: Claire Ngozo

Hopes To Heal Economy Through Devaluation, Which Has Hit Poor Hard

As Malawi’s poor struggle to afford food and other staple items since the 48 percent devaluation of the local currency against the dollar, economic commentators are optimistic that the move will provide an opportunity to boost the country’s export market.

Itamaraty Palace (Brazil’s foreign ministry), homebase for the country’s South-South development aid strategy.

Brazil, Emerging South-South Donor

The Brazilian government is stepping up South-South aid, to strengthen the South American giant’s status as a donor country and its international clout. It now provides assistance to 65 countries, and its financial aid has grown threefold in the last seven years.

The newly completed African Union building in downtown Addis Ababa. Credit: Mekonnen Teshome/IPS

ETHIOPIA: “Significant Progress Towards Improving Livelihoods”

Ethiopia says that the double-digit economic growth the country has experienced over the last seven years has started benefitting its majority by boosting their income and productivity in agriculture and small-scale businesses.

Clinton Champions Gender Agenda at Busan

Women toil in the fields for most of their lives producing food and strengthening the largely agricultural economy of African countries, but when their fathers, husbands or older sons die, they are no longer welcome on land they may have tended for years.