Stories written by Paul Weinberg
Paul Weinberg is a Toronto-based freelancer writer who has written for IPS since 1996. He is also a regular contributor to local weekly magazine NOW and specializes in Canadian politics, in particular foreign, security and defence policy. Paul is currently writing a book on the RCMP’s spying on academics in Canada during the 1960s. | Web

AFGHANISTAN: The Next Quagmire?

Canada and its allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) could soon find themselves smack dab in the middle of a Colombian-style drug war in Afghanistan, warns a prominent drug control expert.

CANADA: MPs Call for Tougher Rules on Overseas Mines

A call by members of Canada's parliament for legally binding measures to govern the behaviour of Canadian mining companies around the world, and specifically to investigate the activities of a Calgary-based operation in the Philippines, has been turned down flat by the Canadian government's foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew.

HEALTH: Disaster’s Psychic Wounds Take Longest to Heal

Public anger over the failures of U.S. federal, state and local authorities to respond quickly to the massive flooding in New Orleans and the U.S. Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina can only deepen the survivors' lasting psychological trauma, says a Yale University sociologist.

/CORRECTED REPEAT/LABOUR: Detroit Catches Cold, Canada Sneezes

Twenty years ago, the Canadian Auto Workers split from the U.S.-based United Auto Workers over disagreements about Canadian autonomy and concessions to employers.

POLITICS: Canada’s Afghan Mission Gets Bloodier

In hooking up with the U.S.-led campaign of counterinsurgency against the Taliban and other resistance forces in the volatile Kandahar region of Afghanistan, Canadian soldiers are abandoning their traditional mandate of peace-building in troubled parts of the world, says a former diplomat.

CANADA: Gay Marriage Galvanises Nascent Religious Right

As Canada joins the three other countries in the world to legalise same-sex marriage, religious conservatives who actively opposed the move are licking their wounds and vowing that their fight is not over.

CANADA: Public Health System Suffers Legal Setback

In a close 4-3 decision, Canada's Supreme Court has put into question the country's system of free doctors and hospital services, held as an alternative to the for-profit model of medical delivery elsewhere in the world.

POLITICS-CANADA: Submarine Death Probe Gives Defence Critics Sinking Feeling

The contested purchase of four second hand, diesel-powered submarines from Britain continues to reverberate in Canada following an inquiry into the death of a naval officer and injury of nine other seamen during a fire on one of the vessels, the HMCS Chicoutimi.

POLITICS-CANADA: Liberal Party Scandal Casts Pall Over National Unity

A political corruption scandal gripping Canada's ruling Liberal party appears to be boosting the prospects of the independence movement in the country's largest province, French-speaking Quebec.

LABOUR: Closure of First Unionised Wal-Mart Sends Chilling Signal

Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, may be violating international and Canadian laws by using covert strategies to undermine a unionising drive at its Canadian stores, say labour experts and union activists.

POLITICS: For Reluctant GI’s, Canada Remains the Great White Hope

So far, only a trickle of U.S. soldiers are heading north to Canada to avoid serving in the U.S. military campaign in Iraq.

POLITICS-CANADA: Questions Linger in Air India Bombing Saga

After two acquittals, a 20-year investigation and the destruction of key taped evidence by intelligence agents, calls are being made for a public inquiry into what has come to be known as Canada's 9/11.

POLITICS-CANADA: "Democratic Renewal" Gets Mixed Reviews

Looking back on the announcement one year ago by Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin that elected members of Parliament in the House of Commons can vote freely on selected government measures and proposed laws, critics are taking a jaundiced look at what has been hailed as an advance in "democratic renewal" by the governing Liberal federal government.

RIGHTS-CANADA: Anti-Terror Laws Sow Fear in Muslim Communities

Passed in the aftermath of the Sep. 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, Canada's Anti-Terrorism Act is being used to intimidate citizens and immigrants of Muslim origin through racial profiling conducted by federal police, activists charge.

TRADE: China Woos Canada, Trade Unions Jittery

The irony of China using the power of the state rather than free markets to boost its industrial, technological and economic development is not lost on Canadian trade unionists - unable over the past two decades to convince their own government to adopt similar measures.

POLITICS: Doubts Multiply as Canada Prepares to Back Iraqi Polls

Although Canada conspicuously stayed out of the war in Iraq two years ago, Ottawa's decision to help monitor the controversial Jan. 30 elections in the violence-torn country has some critics wondering about the choices being made by a national government that styles itself as a promoter of democracy internationally.

POLITICS: Doubts Multiply as Canada Prepares to Back Iraqi Polls

Although Canada conspicuously stayed out of the war in Iraq two years ago, Ottawa's decision to help monitor the controversial Jan. 30 elections in the violence-torn country has some critics wondering about the choices being made by a national government that styles itself as a promoter of democracy internationally.

CANADA: Tiptoeing Around Weapons in Space

Ottawa's tendency to take contradictory or ambiguous political positions on sensitive issues will be put to the test in the current debate over the U.S. request that its northern neighbour endorse its controversial ballistic missile defence (BMD) programme.

CANADA: Details of Arar Torture Could be Sealed

How to shed light on one Canadian's nightmare experience in a jail in Syria and the secretive U.S.-inspired, extralegal global system of interrogation and torture that put him there are challenges facing one judge here, who must also confront "national security" barriers put up by Ottawa.

WORLD AIDS DAY: Profits Delay Cheap Canadian Drugs

The highly touted Canadian plan to export cheap medicines to poor developing countries fighting HIV/AIDS and other health emergencies, hailed by Prime Minister Paul Martin in his June re-election campaign as a bold achievement, is in trouble over profits for participating drug makers.

POLITICS: Groups Fear Canada Tilting to Israel

Fears are rising among groups that lobby for the Palestinian cause that Canada might be abandoning its traditional middle-of-the-road position on the Israeli-Palestine conflict.

« Previous PageNext Page »