Stories written by Desmond Brown
Desmond became an IPS contributor in February 2012 and now serves as the lead environment correspondent in the Caribbean. Prior to this, he co-produced and co-anchored the Caribbean Media Corporation's Radio News as well as the Caribbean Today Updates; Caribbean Newsline and Primetime Caribbean on CMC's Global Television Channel, CaribVision. Desmond was educated in Jamaica and worked for several major Radio and Television stations in the Caribbean. He has been a news anchor at CCN TV6 in Trinidad and Tobago; the Grenada Broadcasting Network; Caribbean News Service and Good News FM in Grenada; and LOVE FM & LOVE Television in Jamaica. He was also a co-presenter of Morning Edition and the Producer/Anchor of the News at Ten and the News at Noon on 6, all news programmes of CCN TV6 in Trinidad. | Twitter |

Storms, Flooding Can Unleash a Toxic Soup

It’s a dirty, smelly business, but wastewater is gaining prominence across the Caribbean as countries from Jamaica in the west to Guyana in the south increasingly recognise its effects on the environment and the importance of improving its management.

U.N. Climate Meet Becomes About “Not Losing Ground”

Diann Black-Layne grew up in a single parent home with nine siblings on the tiny Caribbean island of Antigua. Still, life was easygoing and enjoyable, she recalls. For her, it was paradise.

New Hope for Haiti’s Decimated Forests

Small farmers could play an important part in making Haiti – where just two percent of trees are still standing – green again.

Fishing Communities Will Face Warmer, Acid Oceans

Eating fish has been an integral part of the Caribbean's cultural traditions for centuries. Fish is also a major source of food and essential nutrients, especially in rural areas where there are scores of small coastal communities.

U.N. Climate Meet: “It’s About Survival”

For the small island developing states of the Caribbean, there is nothing more important than the United Nations Climate Change Conference taking place here at the national stadium of Poland from Nov. 11-22.

St. Vincent’s Volcano Holds More Promise Than Peril

Weary of sky-high electricity prices, St. Vincent is following in the footsteps of another, decidedly un-tropical island nearly 4,000 miles away in its quest to harness clean geothermal power.

Mining Takes a Bite Out of Guyana’s Amazon

Guyana is engaged in a balancing act to save its rainforest, regarded as a living treasure, from the destructive activities of miners digging their way to another kind of treasure buried beneath this fragile ecosystem.

Mangroves Help Guyana Defend Against Changing Climate

Theola Fortune can recall how residents of Victoria would ridicule her and others every time they went into the east coast village to warn residents about the importance of mangroves and the need to protect them.

Climate Change a Mixed Blessing for Coconut Farmers

Climbing up the coconut industry has been anything but easy for Rosamund Benn, who has dedicated the past 32 years of her life working on a 50-acre coconut farm in The Pomeroon, a farming region of Guyana.

Climate Change a Mixed Blessing for Coconut Farmers

Climbing up the coconut industry has been anything but easy for Rosamund Benn, who has dedicated the past 32 years of her life working on a 50-acre coconut farm in The Pomeroon, a farming region of Guyana.

Small Island Economies Battered by Erratic Weather

Malcolm Wallace always knew on which side his bread would be buttered.

Caribbean Apprehensive as Dangers of Climate Change Increase

It has taken just eight inches of water for Jamaica to be affected by rising sea levels, with parts of the island nation have disappeared completely, threatening people's livelihoods and much more.

Facing Tough Times, Barbuda Continues Sand Mining Despite Warnings

Arthur Nibbs was known for his staunch opposition to sand mining in his homeland of Barbuda, a Caribbean island with dazzling white sand beaches that comprise most of its deserted coastline.

Caribbean Looks at Financial Approach to Combat Climate Change

The Caribbean has the unenviable reputation as one of the most disaster-prone regions in the world, a situation exacerbated by climate change and vulnerability that experts warn could have significant economic consequences if unaddressed.

Climate Change Threatens Water and Food Security in Antigua

With their islands devoid of rivers or streams, farmers in Antigua and Barbuda have been building dams and ponds for centuries, harvesting rainwater to irrigate their crops and provide drinking water for their livestock.

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