Stories written by David Elkins

New Leaders in Yemen, Same Old System

A new report released by Human Rights Watch (HRW) Friday contends that the dearth of meaningful reform in the protection of human rights and the rule of law in Yemen threatens political stability as the fledgling transitional government copes with a deteriorating economy and continued violence.

Thousands fleeing fighting last year in Kadugli, the capital of Southern Kordofan State, seek refuge in area secured by UNMIS. Credit: UN Photo/Paul Banks

U.S. Boosts Sudan Aid as Humanitarian Crisis Deepens

In a memorandum released Tuesday, President Barack Obama ordered the State Department to allocate additional humanitarian assistance funds for Sudan as famine looms for thousands of civilians caught between intensified levels of armed conflict along the borders of Sudan and South Sudan.

Rights Groups Slam Renewed U.S. Military Aid to Egypt

The U.S. State Department announced on Friday that military aid to Egypt will resume, citing a national security waiver that was included in the most resent appropriations legislation on foreign assistance.

U.S. Urged to Leverage Security Cooperation with Bahrain

As government crackdowns continue, Bahrain is attracting more international visitors than just those coming in preparation for next month's Forumla One Grand Prix.

Bahrainis Demand More Than Cosmetic Reforms

Months after an independent commission presented damning evidence of the Bahraini government's crackdown on pro- democracy demonstrators, thousands press on with a reinvigorated protest movement for genuine reform.

Libyan Air Strike Victims Still Waiting for Redress

Amnesty International (AI) released a scathing report late last week calling for an investigation into civilian deaths from air strikes during the 2011 NATO-led military intervention in Libya, which began one year ago Monday.

No Settlement in Sight as Syria Violence Intensifies

As Western governments reexamine their options for ending the ongoing violence in Syria, Kofi Annan, U.N.-Arab League special envoy to Syria, briefed diplomats Friday at the U.N. Security Council, who remain divided over whether a negotiated ceasefire or direct intervention will be necessary, or even feasible.

Ethnic clashes persist in South Sudan's Jonglei State. Credit: UN Photo/Isaac Billy

Humanitarian Disaster Unfolding in South Sudan

Less than a year since South Sudan's independence, thousands of people in the region continue to face the stark realities of secession.

Syria Mines Border Escape Routes, Rights Group Charges

The Syrian military has placed anti-personnel mines along its borders with Turkey and Lebanon, which have provided asylum for a large number of civilians fleeing the crackdown on year- long pro-democracy uprisings there, according to Human Rights Watch (HRW).

For many survivors of the last Israeli war on Gaza, time has not healed their wounds, physical or emotional. Credit: Eva Bartlett/IPS

U.S. Weapons Claiming Palestinian Lives, Group Says

A new policy paper published earlier this week by the U.S. Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation documents a number of cases occurring over the past decade in which weapons and ammunition produced and financed by the U.S. have been used to kill unarmed Palestinians and U.S. citizens.

The use of drones for targeted assassinations in Yemen and elsewhere has created a storm of controversy in the United States and beyond. Credit: Northrop Grumman/CC by 2.0

Groups Reject Holder’s Defence of Targeted Assassination

Two days after U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined the statutory justifications for "targeted killings", civil liberties groups here continue to question the legality of the Obama administration's policy, particularly as it applies to the rights and very lives of both U.S. citizens and foreign nationals.

U.S. Wins Release of NGO Workers, Aid to Egypt Still Vulnerable

After weeks of political pressure from the U.S., Egyptian officials announced Wednesday that the remaining employees of two U.S. government-supported organisations facing a criminal investigation would be permitted to leave the country.

U.S. Wins Release of NGO Workers, Aid to Egypt Still Vulnerable

After weeks of political pressure from the U.S., Egyptian officials announced Wednesday that the remaining employees of two U.S. government-supported organisations facing a criminal investigation would be permitted to leave the country.

Few Surprises in Obama’s Mideast Speech

In a much-anticipated speech on the Middle East and North Africa on Thursday, U.S. President Barack Obama broadly outlined an ambitious set of U.S.-guided initiatives intended to reinforce economic and political prosperity, democratic reforms and, most emphatically, self-determination for the millions of protestors throughout the region who have taken to the streets over the past six months.

Osama the Symbol Not So Easy to Vanquish

Far from concluding the war on terror, both Western and Muslim-majority countries - many emerging or still embroiled in months of popular protests – will continue to face a threat from extremist ideology after the United States' decade-long campaign to capture or kill Osama bin Laden has come to an end, most analysts say.



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